Wild Green Thinking

This June I'll be blogging about for the Wildlife Trusts on their annual #30DaysWild initiative. The premise is to do something 'wild' for 30 consecutive days throughout the month, ideally sharing what you are doing through social media. Acts of wildness great and small are welcome, and there is a helpful collection of 101 ideas here, where you can also find a link to this years list of bloggers.The majority of my 30DaysWild posts will follow the standard format, describing my outdoor activities and observations. However, other posts will be a little more conceptual in nature, such as thinking about the concept of 'wildness', the health benefits of spending time outdoors, current issues in wilderness management, or maybe even the use of...
If an assessment is to be made regarding the effect of wild time on health or wellbeing, then a clear conceptualisation of 'wild' must at least be attempted. However, it could justifiably be claimed that practically every inch of ground in the UK is to some extent 'managed' or subject to explicit or implicit human manipulation. True wilderness can perhaps only evolve in geological time, rather than ever be created. Does this render the underlying concept redundant? The immediate etymological root for 'wild' is from the old english 'wilde', meaning "in the natural state, uncultivated, untamed, undomesticated, uncontrolled", so not much hope there. 'Wilderness,' however, denotes a place inhabited only by wild animals, most specifically wil...